VILLA ROMANA - HOME
VILLA ROMANA - HOME

Exhibitions

22 Jun                     25 Aug 2017

Ten Steps from Genetic Erosion

Andrea d’Amore

You and your friends are cordially invited to the opening
of the exhibition on Thursday, June 22 at 7.30 pm.

Opening hours: Tuesday to Friday 2 to 6 pm and on appointment

rosa murales

exhibition view

rosa murales

exhibition view

rosa murales

detail

rosa murales

detail

Photos: Ela Bialkowska, OKNOstudio



Throughout its history, our planet has never been so shaped by human beings as in the last 50 or 60 years of the new era, called the Anthropocene period. Humanity has never had as much influence as it does now on biological, geological and weather conditions on Earth. Mankind itself has become a geological factor, while the wild exploitation of the variety of species threatens existence itself. Last year, the WWF came to know that of the more than 14,000 vertebrate populations registered, in recent years the genetic heritage has been reduced by almost 60% - a true genetic erosion.

Andrea d'Amore, an artist living in Tuscany, is admonishing us: Saving humanity from extinction means to saveguard agricultural biodiversity. Condemning the privatization of production, and changing and exchanging crops, are acts of resistance, of survival.

His plastic works are the results of exchange processes between natural bodies that nourish each other. Their foundation is the earth. The artist placed damp blocks of clay on land in the Casentino, where wild animals dig and bite in search of nourishment. In Molise, he had the responsibility of guarding the Turchesca potato, endangered with extinction, and collaborated with master brewer Biagio Sannino to obtain a beer stored in cubes of earth. With his own hands, he reproduced the imprint of the empty spaces left by animal carcasses and secretly picked up the graphic traces of his guests during their dinner meetings. He has created a salami that symbolically recalls the ritual of eating. In Abruzzo, he followsed the scent of banditry.

"Walking toward oneself with a sense of purpose to find clay in the countryside. Digging for it, finding it, sifting it, drying it, exposing it to the sun, kneading it with water, drinking and spreading it. Defecating. Repeat the cycle on animal carcasses. Sacrificing your catch, your very job, your wealth, to restore a soul, to go back to a natural cycle made up of prey and predators in tense symbiotic equilibriums, to ensure a remedy."

During the exhibition an edition will be published with critical texts on biodiversity which can be composted after reading. The edition is printed with acacia and grayling ink on paper produced in Sri Lanka, made up of 80% elephant dung and 20% rice.

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